Vitamin D




Vitamin D helps regulate the amount of calcium and phosphate in the body.

These nutrients are needed to keep bones, teeth and muscles healthy.

A lack of vitamin D can lead to bone deformities such as rickets in children, and bone pain caused by a condition called osteomalacia in adults.


Good sources of Vitamin D


From about late March/early April to the end of September, most people should be able to get all the Vitamin D they need from sunlight.

The body creates Vitamin D from direct sunlight on the skin when outdoors.

But between October and early March we don't get enough Vitamin D from sunlight.


Vitamin D is also found in a small number of foods. Sources include:

  • Oily fish – such as salmon, sardines, herring and mackerel

  • Red meat

  • Liver

  • Egg yolks

  • Fortified foods – such as most fat spreads and some breakfast cereals

In the UK, cows' milk is generally not a good source of Vitamin D because it isn't fortified, as it is in some other countries.


Another source of Vitamin D is dietary supplements.



How much Vitamin D do I need?


Babies up to the age of 1 year need to take between 8.5 to 10 micrograms of Vitamin D a day.

A microgram (mcg) is 1,000 times smaller than a milligram (mg).

The word microgram is sometimes written with the Greek symbol μ followed by the letter g (μg).

Children from the age of 1 year and adults need 10 micrograms of Vitamin D a day. This includes pregnant and breastfeeding women, and people at risk of Vitamin D deficiency.


From about late March/early April to the end of September, the majority of people should be able to get all the Vitamin D they need from sunlight on their skin.



Should I take a Vitamin D supplement?


Short answer - Yes.
To protect bone and muscle health, everyone needs Vitamin D equivalent to an average daily intake of 10 micrograms - Public Health England


Advice for infants and young children


The Department of Health recommends that:

  • Breastfed babies from birth to 1 year of age should be given a daily supplement containing 8.5 to 10 micrograms of Vitamin D to make sure they get enough

  • Formula-fed babies shouldn't be given a Vitamin D supplement until they're having less than 500ml (about a pint) of infant formula a day, as infant formula is fortified with vitamin D

  • Children aged 1 to 4 years old should be given a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of Vitamin D

Recommended product(s)

SynBio® Vitamin D3 Drops (100 IU/drop) [20ml]


Advice for adults and children over 5 years old


During the autumn and winter, you need to get Vitamin D from your diet because the sun isn't strong enough for the body to make Vitamin D.


But since it's difficult for people to get enough Vitamin D from food alone, everyone (including pregnant and breastfeeding women) should consider taking a daily supplement containing 10 micrograms of Vitamin D during the autumn and winter.


Between late March/early April to the end of September, most people can get all the Vitamin D they need through sunlight on their skin and from a balanced diet.


You may choose not to take a Vitamin D supplement during these months.


Recommended product(s)

SynBio® Vitamin D3 Liquid (800 IU/ml) [50ml]

SynBio® Vitamin D3 400 IU Capsules

SynBio® Vitamin D3 800 IU Capsules

SynBio® Vegan Vitamin D3 800 IU Capsules

SynBio® One+1